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Java developer looking for telecommuting job

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aragon 3
fuzz81 5
ixtlan 2

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ixtlan --- 2 years ago -

I am looking for telecommuting work as a Java programmer....I am used to working in office environment. I am looking on job boards, but not finding much. Any tips? (I have already contacted friends and family, but can't find anything going down that path) 

fuzz81 --- 2 years ago -

Don't take this the wrong way, but my advice is to learn a new language. Java isn't desirable except in supporting legacy code which you likely won't find for telecommuting.

I did C development for 15 years, but I've picked up so many other languages along the way to stay relevant in the market.

Golang is the new thing now, especially for small companies.

Javascript/Node.JS is popular for web. 

ixtlan --- 2 years ago -

How did you find your telecommute work? Did you know people at the company? networking? is there a web site?

I looked at some freelance web sites, but they don't seem to offer much....work is too much, pay is too low, and competition too much.

I don't have a prob. with learning new stuff...what about Android, JQuery, Bootstrap? 

fuzz81 --- 2 years ago -

I sold a startup to a bay area company for my current remote position. Prior to that, I mostly worked in offices for small companies.

I've always got jobs by networking.

Have you built a LinkedIn profile, joined groups, been active in any open source projects, published work on Github? 

aragon --- 2 years ago -

I looked at some freelance web sites, but they don't seem to offer much....work is too much, pay is too low, and competition too much.

What do you think is a fair hourly rate for Java dev? 

aragon --- 2 years ago -

Golang is the new thing now, especially for small companies.

Javascript/Node.JS is popular for web.


After being stuck in the Microsoft world for a long time, I'm branching out into open source myself.

I knew some of it from years past, but been stuck in big corp world for a while (they don't like open source).

Golang is a new one for me. I'll have to check that out.

As for various cool open source stuff:

AngularJS looks useful.

Still unsure about subversion versus GitHub for contract projects.

Using Eclipse EE as the IDE. PostgreSQL for database.

It's the wild wild west out there in the open source world. While there are plenty of standards (which is a problem all by itself), there doesn't seem to be a lot of stability.

Which of course is why big corps have mostly stuck with .net

But I'm tired of that world.

Other than golang, any other alternatives to Java (other than the standard C++,C#, etc).

I ask because I know several companies who are using Java on the server side, .....for new work.

But I will definitely take a look at golang. 

fuzz81 --- 2 years ago -

PostgreSQL is great. I've been using it for a decade. So much better than MySQL, and especially old junk like oracle.

I've always done mostly C, assembly, Python, Ruby.

Python is still a solid language to learn. There's also Rust, and D which are compiled languages. Golang seems to be dominating in the pattern style languages though.

The "enterprise" environments are slowly learning that open source/modern technology/innovation matters, or they loose talent. They're also learning that TCO of open source is lower (it used to be that big companies wouldn't touch anything with "professional support". In my experience, support is a meaningless checkbox)

OSS is arguably far more stable than .net, and Java. You just have to know what you're doing ;) 

fuzz81 --- 2 years ago -

Take a look at IBM for example, which was caught with its pants down with AIX operating system getting completely destroyed by Linux (open source GNU license).

In the early 2000s, IBM switched everything to Linux, including AIX5L which ran on the Linux kernel on their PowerPC architectures.

The same fate came to Hewlett Packard HPUX on their HPPA and alpha architectures.

Sun Microsystems had the same issues with SPARC before oracle acquired them.

Then oracle ended up buying MySQL, because their junk Java based DBMS couldn't compete with OSS 

fuzz81 --- 2 years ago -

Today, the entire internet essentially runs on open source software.

Embedded systems mostly run Linux, sometimes BSD.

Look at the license screen on any new Smart TV, and you'll see that it's using the open source Linux kernel 

aragon --- 2 years ago -

Today, the entire internet essentially runs on open source software.

External yes. Business side, not yet.

I just got done working with a vendor on a large scale asp.net app for my soon to be ex employer. SharePoint, Team Foundation Server, VisualCron... bloat.

Could have written it myself in 1/10th the time it took for us to just to make it work for our environment and requirements.

I told them that way back. They didn't listen. But of course it's all my fault that it took a long time to shoe-horn that awful POS into our environment.

Buy versus Build, not always a good idea in niche markets. 

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