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Kingwood High School

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whatchamacallit 1
Rubicon 1
Gigix4 1
Puss In Boots 2
SteelMagnoliaNTx 1
TinktheSprite 1
trailwoodmom 1
witchywoman 2
DVaz 1
kwpeep 1
Tryingto 7
AppleOfHisEye 6

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SteelMagnoliaNTx --- 3 years ago -

Has anyone heard that KHS will be torn down and rebuilt from scratch? That rumor is in circulation.. just wondering. 

DVaz --- 3 years ago -

They just spent millions of dollars in 2008/2009 remodeling & renovating it. I seriously doubt it. That would take two or three years. 

AppleOfHisEye --- 3 years ago -

I hope not bc my step son has a long bus ride to SCHS. I'm hoping KHS will be ready next year at least. 

TinktheSprite --- 3 years ago -

I read they were going to spend $30-40 MILLION dollars to repair. Also read a good idea: Make the bottom a parking garage and build a new school on top/ Solves the parking problem and flooding problem in one sweep. (I thought that was a good idea but I know nothing about building construction!) 

whatchamacallit --- 3 years ago -

That seems like a good idea. It would help with both the flooding and lack of parking space for the students. 

Tryingto --- 3 years ago -

I hope not bc my step son has a long bus ride to SCHS. I'm hoping KHS will be ready next year at least


It's not just the ride to school that's the issue, it is the complete trauma they have endured. There are counselors, but there is no consistent schedule to see kids (that I am aware of), and no teen is going to volunteer to appear weak and just show up. I made an appointment and he wouldn't talk. I wish they would create group therapy on campus or a church or a restauraunt and help them work this through so teens hear what to expect from others and from each other, as this is a community health issue, not an individual child's failing, parent failing, or even just a commute problem.

Getting a routine is great. Sports are great. But, it is normal to have difficulty concentrating, depression, sadness, anger, grief and helplessness within three weeks after a disaster, all of which makes doing regular things harder, for parents and children alike.

Recovery isn't just rebuilding, it's relearning how to identify feelings, figure out healthy outlets without normal stores and businesses, adjust expectations, and reaching out. If it is hard on an adult, imagine an underdeveloped, hormonal brain trying to untangle this--

Also, if parents don't work is it possible they could make carpools as they adjust or Uber cuts rates. The last thing a teen needs is to be at home alone now.

A building, while a nice visual reminder of normalcy, is not going to help them work through the very complicated feelings they have, or provide coping skills they need to implement to thrive. They need this as much as AP math, or any other subject.

Many families are cash broke, and just making an appointment is another hurdle, and searching for funds another.

Could churches, schools, volunteer professionals make regular meetings at regular places so everyone knows where to go to get assistance? Even short lectures, simple coping, etc, with a group could help.

I'm not an expert, but I am very worried for our kids right now, as we are entering a new phase in recovery. 

AppleOfHisEye --- 3 years ago -

The only thing affecting us is the bus ride. Our neighborhood Mills Branch didn't flood and neither did our old neighborhood Woodspring Forest. We only had a tiny roof leak. I understand trauma though bc I lost my dad when I was 16, and having to go to school after that wasn't easy. So I can imagine going to school after losing everything would be hard. Everyone reacts to things differently though..Some are stronger than others. 

Gigix4 --- 3 years ago -

Make the bottom a parking garage and build a new school on top/ Solves the parking problem and flooding problem in one sweep.

That seems like an excellent idea! But ... is there a handicap issue with that? 

Tryingto --- 3 years ago -

The only thing affecting us is the bus ride. Our neighborhood Mills Branch didn't flood and neither did our old neighborhood Woodspring Forest. We only had a tiny roof leak. I understand trauma though bc I lost my dad when I was 16, and having to go to school after that wasn't easy. So I can imagine going to school after losing everything would be hard. Everyone reacts to things differently though..Some are stronger than others.


In that case, maybe Porter may be an option, since you don't have to go so far.

Whether you lost your home or not, the trauma is likely to impact most students who live in the area....their school is gone. They saw their friends homes destroyed, the Y, the grocery store, they watched anxious parents, and saw a downtown disappear and experienced a universal helplessness that is unique to disaster.

Death is tragic and hard, but does not generally strike in a giant citywide mass casualty. Maybe you see a house burn down and feel bad, but is mind blowing to see an entire neighborhood gone...and then another. Whether it was your house directly or not, it is impossible for a human to not experience trauma from that.

It is generally three weeks when survival mode turns to emotional overload. For teens, that's anger, complaining, poor grades, sleeping etc. It's also the same point adults feel the impact.

The district did everything in their power to provide normalcy right away. So, while the ride is annoying, and maybe worsened by other factors, please make sure that they commute is really the issue, and not all the other stuff they are experiencing. It's easy to say I hate the bus. It's a lot harder to say I feel helpless, sad, and angry and don't know how to process or what to do. And what teen (or adult) wants to be vulnerable that way.

You can still put one foot in front of the other and learn how to implement strong(er) coping skills. Just because you seem ok, doesn't mean you are. It also doesn't mean you lack strength.

Becoming gritty and resilient is not a matter of not letting things get to you or hiding feelings. It's knowing you have the ability to be honest, get good feedback, implement ++ coping skills, and find gratitude. Those spared, may have a commute, but they are afforded the extra energy to assist others who deal with that and way more. 

AppleOfHisEye --- 3 years ago -

Death is tragic and hard, but does not generally strike in a giant citywide mass casualty.

Yeah which makes it worse for the person who lost someone. Bc they are grieving alone. Honestly I would prefer losing my home over a loved one.

Matthew 6:19

Treasures in Heaven

19Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal: 20But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: 21For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. 

Rubicon --- 3 years ago -

Make the bottom a parking garage and build a new school on top/ Solves the parking problem and flooding problem in one sweep.

Sounds like a great idea to me. Parking is very limited there. I really don't think that would work though. The school has a weird setup, it has 4 floors but staggered so it's really only 2 stories. 

Tryingto --- 3 years ago -

Yeah which makes it worse for the person who lost someone. Bc they are grieving alone. Honestly I would prefer losing my home over a loved one.


I've lost many family members, suffered extreme trauma in adolescence and I was never alone, and never grieved alone. Ironically, lots of people were around the whole time.

I felt very much alone in that crowd of family and friends because I believed my reactions, feelings, or thoughts were bothersome or wrong, hid them to avoid worrying others, or didn't have a person to turn to ask to do next for fear I would be judged and distrusted many. Or, I figured it didn't matter, so sucked it up. A lot of people mistake pretending for coping. My parents thought counseling was a waste. I busied myself overachieving instead. Outwardly, I must have been coping really well! I wasn't.

I also lost a home and a job at once and spent months in a shelter. It hurt too and I share absolute compassion for those there now. It is still incredibly painful and earth shattering in a different way.

Silence, shame and a fear of being honest and not having a trusted person to turn to is what damages most people, prolongs recovery etc. in teens in particular. 

kwpeep --- 3 years ago -

Woodridge Baptist Church has a Beyond Harvey support group. Every Sunday at 4:30PM 

trailwoodmom --- 3 years ago -

Tryingto, you are spot on. But let me expand upon that: our senior citizens. The Enclave, completely destroyed, was home to retirees/senior citizens. I see folks in their '80s looking at this devastation. So terribly sad and frightening for them. 

AppleOfHisEye --- 3 years ago -

Ironically, lots of people were around the whole time.

I felt very much alone in that crowd of family and friends because I believed my reactions, feelings, or thoughts were bothersome or wrong, hid them to avoid worrying others, or didn't have a person to turn to ask to do next for fear I would be judged and distrusted many. Or, I figured it didn't matter, so sucked it up. A lot of people mistake pretending for coping. My parents thought counseling was a waste. I busied myself overachieving instead. Outwardly, I must have been coping really well! I wasn't.


Most of our friends quit speaking to us. It was strange and very hurtful. I assume it's bc they couldn't understand and didn't know how to react. So me and my Mom and little brother grieved alone. And we grieved at different times and in different ways. I sucked it up, didn't cry, and went straight back to school and swim practice, and I felt like I was missing my insides. Best way to describe how I felt. It came out later with heart palpitations and aanxietyattacks and I had no clue why, until my Cardiologist told me it was stress from what I went through, not heart problems. We all go through something. 

AppleOfHisEye --- 3 years ago -

What bothered me the most was seeing the senior citizens sitting in rising water in their nursing homes, waiting to be rescued. 

Tryingto --- 3 years ago -

Trailwood mom,

Your comment tears me up. My father was cared for at Westminister and then Arbor Terrace for the last years of his life. We had regular family dinner there, knew the residents, and it was a wonderful way for my kids to get to know and hear about the residents stories and lives. I had to choke back tears, and not cry before asking an officer if they all got out okay. Aware the Enclave was there too. THE KHS journalism club interviewed the seniors for a project and wrote a cute story about his life that he loved and he hung it and showed every nurse or aide that came in. We read it at his funeral, and I'm now reminded that when it's back again, it's something my kids can do. And to the KHS teacher that organized it all those years ago, thanks. He told the KHS journalists, "If I could relive one moment in life, it would be having my kids." He wasn't touchy-feely. But, he made sure we knew before he left earth. And a simple HS project of listening and getting to know people changed his life and ours. 

Tryingto --- 3 years ago -

Most of our friends quit speaking to us. It was strange and very hurtful. I assume it's bc they couldn't understand and didn't know how to react. So me and my Mom and little brother grieved alone. And we grieved at different times and in different ways. I sucked it up, didn't cry, and went straight back to school and swim practice, and I felt like I was missing my insides. Best way to describe how I felt. It came out later with heart palpitations and aanxietyattacks and I had no clue why, until my Cardiologist told me it was stress from what I went through, not heart problems. We all go through something.

I'm so sorry, because there is nothing worse than feeling so alone and powerless and then literally carrying the heartache on and on. And to be abandoned my so many when you most needed it. I'm so sorry.

There are strategies to prevent our kids from having to live with it so long. We can't remove or stop suffering, but we can empower them to cope more effectively when faced with it. I'm not an expert, but there are lots that are that I hope will come forward for our community. 

Puss In Boots --- 3 years ago -

HomeDepartmentsSupporting the Whole Child Through the Storm
Support
Humble ISD Support Groups for Students, Families, and Staff Affected by Harvey
Supporting the Whole Child Through the Storm
3 Locations: Summer Creek High School, Kingwood Park High School, and Community Learning Center
Meeting Every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. from September 19 through October 24
FAQs
1. Who can attend these support groups?
Anyone who was affected by Hurricane Harvey is welcome at any of the community support groups. There will be child care for those too young to participate in support groups
2. What is too young to participate in support groups?
Children of all ages are affected differently by natural disasters. The support staff and parents will make that decision together.
3. When I get to one of those locations, where do I park/go?
Summer Creek High School groups will meet in the Copper LGI. That is on the right side of the building. You will park in the right side parking lot and enter through the PAC doors. Turn left and follow the signs.
Kingwood Park High School groups will meet in the Lower LGI. You will park on the right side parking lot and enter through the doors on that side of the building. When you enter, the LGI will be right in front of you. Please follow the signs.
The Community Learning Center groups will meet in the cafeteria. You will park on the left side of the building and enter through the doors at the end. The cafeteria is on the left when you walk in. Please follow the signs.
4. What will the groups be about?
Support groups focus on the needs of the group itself. The initial meeting will be a needs assessment to figure out what specific support is needed. After that, we will be using information from the National Child Trauma Stress Network.
5. How will the groups be divided?
We will be using the information gathered on the first night to determine what groups we will have and how many people will be particicpating.
6. Who will be running the support groups?
A mix of counselors that serve as campus counselors in Humble ISD as well as some local Liscensed Professional Counselors.
7. Will food or snacks be provided?
The first group we will have snacks and drinks for everyone from 6:00-6:30. After we know the needs, we may provide dinner for all who attend (from 6:00-6:30). We will know more after the first group is conducted.
8. Will child care be provided every week?
Yes. Our local high school clubs and organization are service oriented. They provide child care at no charge for many community events.
9. How long will the support group last?
The group will meet once a week on Tuesdays from September 19th through October 24th. Snacks will start at 6:00 pm and the actual group will begin at 6:30. Most group will last about one hour.
10. What happens after the group? What if I still need to meet with someone?
After the initial 6 week support group, your campus guidance counselors are all certified mental health professionals. They are there for our families at any time. We also have a list of local Liscenced Professional Counselors that provide outside counseling services to individuals and families.
11. What if I don't think I need support now, but decide later that I do?
We will start with an initial 6 week support group. If there is a need for additional support groups, we will meet that need. 

AppleOfHisEye --- 3 years ago -

I'm so sorry, because there is nothing worse than feeling so alone and powerless and then literally carrying the heartache on and on. And to be abandoned my so many when you most needed it. I'm so sorry.

There are strategies to prevent our kids from having to live with it so long. We can't remove or stop suffering, but we can empower them to cope more effectively when faced with it. I'm not an expert, but there are lots that are that I hope will come forward for our community.?


Yes thank you.. it was very hard and confusing but going through it made me stronger and made me reach out to God. The good thing about this disaster, is that people are loving thy neighbor and hopefully reaching out to God bc that's what's most important. 

Tryingto --- 3 years ago -

Puss and Boots--thanks. That sounds wonderful and I appreciate you adding it. I will start a different thread with local counseling sources and groups, and post yours if that is okay. 

Puss In Boots --- 3 years ago -

Glad to help! 

witchywoman --- 3 years ago -

That seems like an excellent idea! But ... is there a handicap issue with that??


Elevator. 

witchywoman --- 3 years ago -

It's not just the kids and the elderly. It's everyone.

I drove by Specs the other night and the place was jam-packed. That's not a good sign.

So many are hurting. 

Tryingto --- 3 years ago -

Witchywoman, I totally agree. I really hope people get help. The sadness is normal and expected. You can't help your children, if you don't help yourself. 

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